Six Tips for Celebrating America’s Independence Day

Six Tips for Celebrating America's Independence Day imageIt is almost the Fourth of July, which for many families in the United States is a time of festivity and celebration as we commemorate our nation’s independence with colorful parades, juicy BBQ’s, loud concerts, and booming fireworks.  These activities can bring many changes in routine and sensory stimulations that may be exciting for some individuals, but difficult for others. Marji Voetberg, one of our teacher consultants, offers these tips for helping all members of your family be prepared and equipped for your Independence Day celebrations.

  1. Prepare children for what to expect.

    This could include showing pictures from a previous year (if you have them) and/or YouTube videos about what to expect during the day. Describe what your son or daughter might see, hear, taste, etc throughout the day. If necessary, discuss that the noises from fireworks are not dangerous sounds. You could include all of these items in a personalized SocialStory (see an example here) that highlights the day’s activities.

  2. Have a plan.

    Explain to your children how you expect to stay together at the event. For example, will everyone wear the same colored shirt? Or stay within a certain distance? Be sure to share what to do if you get split up.

  3. Bring the right tools.

    Especially for fireworks, it may be helpful to bring blankets (wrap your child in for deep pressure), ear plugs, sunglasses, etc. These tools can provide sensory input breaks/decreased input.

  4. Use a camera.

    If you’re headed to fireworks or an event where there is a lot going on, bring a camera that your son or daughter could use. Looking through the camera at the event brings the focus in to one object/event and may help your child feel less overwhelmed by all of the things that are going on.

  5. Talk about food.

    Be sure to discuss candy consumption guidelines in advance. This is particularly important if your son or daughter has any food allergies.

  6. Think ahead.

    In general, think about what triggers there may be for your child in any of the celebratory events. Prepare your child and yourself for how to handle those triggers.

Alternately, some families prefer to avoid Fourth of July celebrations because of the excitement. For these families, it may be a good idea to shut your windows and turn on any fans as loud as possible in the evening. Find a fun family activity or movie to enjoy that allows your family to spend quality time together indoors.

Regardless of what your family does, the main goal is to plan ahead for the holiday and prepare your family for what to expect.

Do you have additional ideas? Share them in the comment box below!

MarjiVoetbergMarji Voetberg is a teacher consultant for CLC Network.

 

 

 

 

Celebrating Pierce’s Gifts: A Blessed Partnership

Reuben and Pierce

Mr. Van Til and Pierce work together in the storage room at West Side Christian School.

You need to walk quickly to keep up with Pierce. He’s one of West Side Christian School’s (Grand Rapids, MI) hardest workers, and one of the fastest. When he and Reuben Van Til, West Side Christian’s custodian, get together, it’s all business… and Pierce clearly loves it.

Depending on the season, Pierce and Mr. Van Til will rake leaves, shovel snow, or work in the garden. “Once it snows, he has his own snow shovel,” Mr. Van Til shares. “Typically at recess he’ll just take that out and clear the sidewalk, without ever being asked.”

Pierce came to West Side Christian in fourth grade, after attending a public school. Right away, he began staying after assemblies to help clear the chairs. His teachers also noticed his interest in working with Mr. Van Til. Kim Mast, paraprofessional, remembers,

“Pierce would be doing reading, writing, and math. Every time Mr. Van Til rode the tractor or walked by, he was very focused on that. He wanted to see what Mr. Van Til was doing, so we would start watching. That’s how we discovered Pierce’s gifts were in manual work and his interest was in whatever Mr. Van Til was doing.”

The next year, Pierce’s teachers arranged for him to officially work with Mr. Van Til. “It makes school much more enjoyable for Pierce,” Mrs. Mast explains. “Just like gym or art class makes school enjoyable for some kids, this kind of work makes school fun for Pierce… It makes for interesting sentences in writing. If Mr. Van Til is the topic, it really helps. It’s so much more interesting to Pierce than other things.”

“If it’s a snow day, Pierce has tears in his eyes,” shares his mother, Koley Hockeborn. “He wants to go and be part of the school. He’s learning from the other kids, too.”

Pierce has a cognitive impairment, and was placed in a segregated classroom for his early schooling. A neighbor encouraged his mother to consider West Side Christian for Pierce, noticing that when he was around other kids his ticks and language would improve. After meeting with West Side Christian’s leadership and teachers, “They said they could teach him. It was scary and a big step, but he has improved in leaps and bounds.” Pierce is now reading, he is learning penmanship, and he is doing multiplication.

“The academic piece is hard for Pierce, but his gifts are his strength and hard work,” explains Maria Bultsma, Educational Support Services Coordinator.

“This arrangement is really using Pierce’s gifts as best we can. He’s still spending time in class, but he’s using his gifts to do things like distributing the milk, picking up chairs after chapel, and paper recycling. The scheduled days with Mr. Van Til are motivation for him.”

Pierce and Reuben working together

Mr. Van Til shows Pierce how to use the leaf blower.

Pierce’s favorite job is riding the tractor. “Last week when we were doing leaves, we’d fill my trailer full of leaves and he rides in the trailer. You don’t see him a whole lot happier than that, and it was a big help to have him out there with me,” says Mr. Van Til. “He likes it when we go in the storage room. He takes my keys and opens the door and turns on the lights. He’s a very hard worker, he works just as hard as I do.”

Pierce’s mother has noticed the difference in Pierce. “Pierce’s teachers at West Side Christian know him, they are so in tune with him. He and Mr. Van Til took to each other right away, and now he’s learning life skills. They created this program for him,” Mrs. Hockeborn shares. Mrs. Bultsma credits CLC Network teacher consultants for providing additional brainstorming and encouragement. “They have provided insight to possible options [for Pierce],” she reflects. “Most of all, [CLC Network consultants] have listened to our concerns and have been very encouraging to our staff.”

“We are working on goals for his future, what he might do after books and after school,” adds Mrs. Bultsma.

“There is a lot of learning going on, a lot of happy things, and a different kind of learning. Pierce has a lot of gifts given to him from God and we’re just trying to figure out how to use those gifts.”

Before working at West Side Christian, Mr. Van Til built custom cabinetry. He’s had the chance to show Pierce his shop and hopes to teach him about a few tools and their basic functions. “It’s a lot nicer than my garage,” says Pierce. “I got to try the air hose,” he remembers with a smile.

Watching Pierce and Mr. Van Til together, their connection shines in both of them. As Mr. Van Til reflects, “It’s advantageous for me and for Pierce to be doing this. I feel a little more important when we work together. It’s not the most glamorous job in the world but I’ve always felt called to be here and share some of my knowledge with the kids.”

This article originally appeared in the Spring 2015 Inclusive newsletter – a biannual newsletter published by the CLC Network advancement office. Sign up on the CLC Network website.

Elizabeth Lucas DombrowskiElizabeth Lucas Dombrowski is the advancement director at CLC Network.

5 Tips for Summer Church Inclusion

First Baptist NashvilleIn the summertime, many churches put their Church School programs and other school-year activities on hold, which creates a new routine for everyone involved.  While some of us like change, a new routine can be difficult for some individuals, particularly individuals with disabilities. Here are some tips for your church to make sure everyone has a smooth transition into the new routine during the summer months.

  1. Communication with Key People

    As you are trying to develop a plan for the summer months, make sure you communicate with the individual, his or her family members, and any care providers. Creating a survey is one way these needs can be communicated to one another (download a free sample survey here). Or, something more informal, such as sitting down and grabbing coffee, works well too. Just be sure to ask rather than assume, what exactly is needed during the summer months.

  2. Summer Church Inclusion Action Plan

    Once you have spoken with the correct people, come up with a plan together about the best way to include the person who has a disability during these summer months. The plan should include ways an individual can use his or her gifts to be involved in areas such as worship, fellowship, and service. This plan should include steps and recommendations for the individual as well as the congregation.

    For example, an individual might worship with praise ribbons during Church School. During the summer months (or even during the rest of the year!), you may want to make praise ribbons accessible during your congregation’s worship time. Make sure that everyone is aware of this change, and that all are welcome to participate. If you are looking for an action plan guide, CLC Network has a “Church Inclusion Action Plan” in the G.L.U.E. Training Manual (available for purchase here).

  3. Schedule/Calendar

    Create a schedule or calendar for the person who has a disability so that he or she is able to anticipate the new summer routine. For example, create a schedule of the order of worship for your service. Or, a calendar of special events your church has over the summer. Be sure to communicate this schedule in a way that is best for the individual, such as using pictures in addition to words.

  4. Preview the Setting

    Allow the person with a disability to come to church before the service and allow him or her to walk through the new routine. For example, rather than heading to Sunday School right before the sermon starts, have him or her practice walking back to a seat in the sanctuary.

  5. Respite Care

    While respite care is hopefully happening throughout the year, this care can be especially important in the summertime as school is out and there is ample amount of free time during the day. Recruit volunteers to spend time with the person who has disabilities while his or her family runs errands, goes out to eat, or simply takes a nap.

As you continue to include those with disabilities into your congregation and navigate the new routine that summertime brings, we hope you find some of these tips helpful and beneficial! You can find additional inclusion tips for Vacation Bible School in this blog post.

 

Jacki Sikkema photoJacki Sikkema has a background in Special Education and is a former church consultant for CLC Network. She will work at Grand Rapids Christian Middle School as a 5th grade teacher in the fall.

 

photo credit: 2008-VBS-Monday-272 via photopin (license)

 

 

 

The Journey of Inclusion at Calvary Church

Inclusion has been 25 years in the making at Calvary Church, and as Judi Warner, director of special needs ministry, says, “Like every church, we’re still on a journey”.

Judi Warner

A former church consultant at CLC Network, Judi began at Calvary Church four years ago with a vision to bring inclusion to the 4,000-member Grand Rapids congregation.  The church had a well-established special needs ministry for kids and adults that grew out of Calvary’s belief that each individual has a place in the community of believers. Building on this foundational value, Judi and her three-person team have helped the children’s, youth, and adult ministries receive the gifts of persons with disabilities in an inclusive and interdependent environment by focusing on each person’s gifts:

“[From what I learned during my time at CLC Network], first and foremost, you look at the individual first and you ask, ‘What are their gifts? What are their weaknesses? What are some of their challenges?’ You focus on the gifts and what their desires are to serve, be served, and serve alongside. It all begins with getting to know that individual first,” shared Judi.

Paving the Way with Children’s Ministry

In such a large church environment, the natural place to begin inclusion was with the children’s ministry.

“It began with me sharing the vision that God put on my heart to see all of his kids included together. And I began asking, ‘How could special needs ministry become more ‘one’ with the children’s ministry (with special needs staff being the support piece)?’ In a beautiful way, God made that gradually happen as parents had their kids included at school and expected the same at church.”

Though they met with initial hesitancy, Judi and her staff consulted often with the children’s ministry staff, parents, and kids to make sure everyone felt supported and equipped.

Through this gradual process, the children’s ministry has been transformed. This fall, Judi’s dream for a unified children’s and special needs ministry will come true with combined staff personnel and training for staff and volunteers. The efforts to unify the ministries are a reflection of the impact inclusion has had on kids. Judi notes,

“It’s an amazing thing when you talk to kids in a classroom and you try to bring awareness about a child with a disability. The kids ‘get it’. It’s like they’re not even different.”

Focusing on Youth Groups

Calvary ChurchBut inclusion doesn’t stop with the children’s ministry at Calvary Church. The middle and high school youth groups focus on identifying the gifts and needs of students with disabilities and placing support structures around those students. “One of the more significant challenges is sensory overload. The youth group spends lots of time in large groups and the room itself can be over stimulating. The special needs ministry staff works with the youth group staff to accommodate or adapt different portions of the ministry.”

Because teens are used to inclusion at their West Michigan Christian and public schools, it was natural to have teens with disabilities in the middle and high school youth groups.

“The high school staff has done a great job of identifying [typical] students who can offer support to a student when needed. And if the staff needs us, then our team jumps in to offer assistance. It has been fun to watch the youth group staff and students take ownership of it. And if inclusion is difficult for an individual, then we invite them to worship and participate in Go-Getters, our adult program.”

Creating Interdependence among Adults

Go-Getters, which began 25 years ago as a self-contained program for kids with disabilities, evolved to serve adults as its attendees grew. Today the program offers worship services, activities, classes, and faith mentoring for more than 130 adults with disabilities and their families.

“God paved the way for each of these individuals to be part of a community within themselves. Our challenge now is to allow the entire Calvary Church community to learn and benefit from one another,” shared Judi.

Calvary Church Go-GettersThe adults are taking steps toward serving together in various ministries. If a member of Go-Getters wants to join a class or church activity, Judi meets with the individual to learn about their gifts and challenges and then matches them up with the right small group or activity. Judi and her team will offer assistance as needed to the leader and participants so that everyone feels equipped and informed. Through small groups, church baptisms, congregation-wide meals, and worship services that are open to everyone, full inclusion is gradually happening among the adults at the church.

“It’s a journey,” Judi acknowledges, with the hope that as kids and teens grow, they will become adults who view inclusion as normalcy. “And that’s what gives me so much hope for God’s vision of it all. These kids will be the adults of tomorrow who will welcome and embrace people with disabilities because ‘why wouldn’t you? These individuals have been part of my life growing up and they’re part of God’s creation just like I am…there’s no setting them apart.’ I look forward to the day when the majority of adults with and without disabilities serve alongside one another in the church.”

Providing Options for Families

Calvary Church The special needs ministry staff recognizes that an inclusive environment does not work for everyone all of the time. While Calvary Church responds graciously to distractions during the worship service, Judi knows that a large worship environment is not always the right fit. She acknowledges the importance of providing people with options and helping each one find their place in the Calvary community.

“We want to provide an opportunity for people to worship the Lord, and for their kids to be well cared for and to share the love of Christ. If that means a separate classroom for a time, then we provide them with options,” said Judi.

Though Calvary Church is still on a journey, their story serves as a testament to God’s faithfulness and desire for each of His children–regardless of their level of ability or disability–to worship and serve together.

Judi’s Advice: Don’t Say “No”

She encourages congregations of all sizes to make a place for each person in their community, “Get to know that individual and their family. Embrace them, welcome them. Have an opportunity very shortly after you meet them to interview them (and their family) and visit their home. Use that information to put together a profile on that individual. Don’t say, ‘No’, instead say, “We’re glad you’re here. We want to get to know you.”

 

Katie Barkley ImageKatie Barkley is the marketing communications manager at CLC Network.

Diverseability Week: How South Christian Celebrates Students’ Differences

Last week, we shared an article about Connections, a program at South Christian High School that seeks to encourage students to build relationships with students across ages, cultures, special needs, and social groups.  In today’s post, Sarah Ress, a senior at the school and member of the Connections leadership, highlights one school-wide activity that celebrates differences: Diversability Week.

Normal. It’s a word used all the time. We refer to this word frequently, and even idolize it. “Why can’t I be normal? Why can’t you act normal? Why does my life have to be so weird, I just want to be normal!” Or, we also comment on how abnormal things are, and how it makes us uncomfortable. “She’s so different, why isn’t she normal? They act so stupid, why can’t they be normal?” Well in all honesty, “normal” isn’t something that anyone can grasp. We are all abnormal in our own ways, and guess what – that’s ok. Being different does not  lower our worth, it gives us unique perspectives to share with the world!

South Christian DisArt Festival

South Christian’s student art show highlighted uniquely made masterpieces.

At South Christian High School (Grand Rapids, MI) this past April, we dedicated a week to celebrating the fact that we are not all made with the same cookie cutter. It was appropriately titled “Diversability Week”. Throughout the week we had a new, diverse focus each day and a devotion for every morning. Monday was our kickoff and students were given an overview of the week, along with a devotion about what it means to be a diverse community. Tuesday we celebrated our international students with 22 flags hung in our hallways representing the different ethnicities of our student body and a chapel with a guest speaker. Wednesday we encouraged students to go out of their comfort zone and befriend someone they normally would not, and then we put encouragement notes up on all of the students’ lockers.

South Christian Ability Fair

The Ability Fair allowed students to hear from a diverse group of community organizations.

We also had an “Ability Fair” in our gym, where students could step out of their normal routine and talk to diverse organizations from our community. A few of those who visited were Mary Free Bed, Camp Sunshine, and CLC Network. On Thursday, we focused on our students involved in inclusive education. We had a chapel with a senior testimony from one of those students, and songs led by some of the other students and their friends. Friday’s purpose was to show that being different truly can lead to great things. That afternoon we had the Grand Rapids Pacers Wheelchair Basketball team come in and play our varsity boys team in wheelchairs. It was an educative and fun way to end the week.

Since Diversability Week, I have had many students and teachers approach me and tell me what they learned from the week. Some people’s eyes were opened to our unique community by the chapels and the devotionals, while others learned more through the assembly and the fair. For me, the week always hits home. I enjoy watching students become more accepting in the weeks that follow and hearing kids talk about what they learned from the fair. I love that the week highlights people, cultures, and talents that are not the norm for most of us! It teaches us that this “normal” that we so often obsess over is not necessary. We learned that being different makes us special and unique but in no way less of a person, and that is why we love having Diversability Week. We should never be afraid to be ourselves!

Sarah RessSarah Ress is a senior at South Christian High School, where she’s been a part of the Connections Council for four years. Sarah will be a freshman at Aquinas College in the fall, majoring in Special Education or Psychology.